Home About Us the Rabbis Contact Us


what's new on Revach
Motza'ei Shabbos Dress Code, To Change or Not to Change

Leil HaSeder Alone in The Shadow of Corona

Stopping Corona: Overwhelmed With Eitzos?

Parshas Tzav: Rabbeinu Bachaye - Covering the Shame of Sinners

Parshas Pinchas: Rav Yehonoson Eibshitz - Where did Zimri the Great Tzaddik go Wrong?
 
Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - Lifnai-Iver
Submitted by Tzvi Schneider  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: You are correct to point out that it is an issue. The ideal solution would be to offer to wait to continue the conversation while the other person says Birchos haTorah.
posted:2009-11-09 20:45:47  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - question about blood transfusion
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:  

First of all I wish you and your new baby the best of health.

From a standpoint of Halacha their is no problem receiving an injection containing or derived from non-Jewish blood and their is no reason to decline neither the vaccine nor the immunoglobulin.

Additionally from a medical standpoint it is VERY important that you follow the doctors advice and administer both injections as well as further booster shots to the baby. If the proper procedures are not followed, your baby has a 95% chance of developing chronic hepatitis B! If these two medications are given correctly within the first 12 hours of life, a newborn has more than a 90% chance of being protected against a lifelong hepatitis B infection. You must make sure your baby receives the second and third dose of the hepatitis B vaccine at one and six months of age to ensure complete protection. People infected with chronic Hepatitis B have a 40% lifetime risk of death from cirrhosis or cancer of the liver. Furthermore extensive medical research has shown only minimal risk of minor complications from the treatment, with even minor discomfort such as chills and diarrhea being uncommon. While your low viral load may significantly reduce the risk of infection, the remaining possibility would still be at least a safek sakana which obligates one to violate even a Torah law. In this circumstance there is absolutely no violation under consideration, and the Torah obligates one to follow accepted medical advice and procedures to insure one's health.

posted:2009-11-08 17:15:37  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - hilchot iom tov
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: It is a problem to derive benefit from work that a goy does for a Jew on Shabbos or Yom Tov. However, if he lit the candle for his own use, you would be allowed to use it afterwards to light your stove.
posted:2009-11-07 20:13:01  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - sleeping on side
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: On the contrary, Halacha advises that a man ONLY sleep on his side because laying on the back or stomach is likely to cause an erection.
posted:2009-11-04 15:13:03  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Lighting Shabbat candles when invited out and not coming back till after shabbat
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

There are some who are machmir not to light 2 sets of candles in the same place, however according to this opinion one must also turn off the electric light in the dining room before lighting the candles because otherwise it is already light.

The general custom is to make a beracha on the increase in light added by the additional candles, and more than one woman may light with a beracha in the same dining room.

posted:2009-11-02 23:05:45  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Making kiddush before kriat hatorah
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Once Shacharis has been davened there is no problem eating a seudas arai. There are 2 different issues at hand, first it is inappropriate to eat before thanking Hashem for giving us life. This is satisfied through Shacharis. Second, one may indulge in a large meal to the point of forgetting to daven, but this does not apply to a seudas arai. If one is ill or appoints a shomer to remind him to daven Mussaf, even a seudas keva may be consumed according to Shmiras Shabbos K'Hilchaso 52:14.
posted:2009-11-02 11:25:14  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - vitamins
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Yes. While some Poskim are lenient with swallowed pills to consider them a non-food item that does not require hashgacha, there are NO grounds to be lenient with flavored chewable vitamins.

posted:2009-10-30 08:25:16  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Covering hair
Submitted by tzvi schneider  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

This is a sensitive and complicated issue which must be asked to a Rav proficient in the Halachos of geirus and personally familiar with the person.

The general rule is that a conversion is invalid even retroactively if the convert knowingly refused to accept at the time of their conversion a single Halacha or even minhag. However if they accepted everything they knew to be obligatory but were inaccurately misinformed that covering the hair is merely a stringency, the conversion would be valid and they would have the same status as any Jew.

posted:2009-10-29 17:24:19  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Nichum Aveilim
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Yes. One says "HaMakom y'nacheim oscha (osach for a female) b'soch shaar aveilei tzion v'Yerusholaim".
posted:2009-10-28 14:52:50  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Borchu
Submitted by Israel  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The Rema OC 133 writes that if one missed borchu he should say it himself at the end of davening, so his behavior seems to be sanctioned by the Shulchan Aruch. Theoretically, if he is habitually negligent in coming to shul on time an assertive Rav could potentially discipline him by banning the practice, however it is rare for a Rav today to be so bold to discipline an adult and few congregants are respectful enough to take it constructively.
posted:2009-10-28 09:59:44  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - vitamins
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: I would not recommend taking ANY vitamins without a hechsher. While there are some grounds to be lenient and consider a swallowed pill different than an food that is eaten, it is not advisable to rely on this opinion except for regarding important medications and not just for vitamins. Additionally today it is possible to find most vitamins with an acceptable hechsher and there is little necessity to rely on leniencies.
posted:2009-10-25 18:59:27  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Propecia on Shabbos
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: It is most likely a problem of refua on Shabbos, because it treats the medical condition of hair loss and is significantly different then taking vitamins which merely supplements the diet. It should be noted that taking vitamin C to stave off a cold would also be a problem of refua on Shabbos.
posted:2009-10-25 02:15:07  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Brith Milah & pain relief
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

The Imrei Yosher and HaRav Elyashiv shlita hold that pain is an intrinsic part of Bris Milah based on a Medrash regarding Avraham Avinu and general or local anesthetic may never be used during a bris. However, the Seridei Eish and HaRav Vozner shlita hold that it is not essential to feel pain and local anesthetic may be used, however general anesthetic should preferably be avoided because it is not acceptable to enter a covenant with Hashem while unconscious. The Maharsham and many other Poskim permit all forms of anesthesia, and this may certainly be relied upon under any extenuating circumstances. However, various forms of anesthesia have been known for centuries and it has never become accepted practice to use them during a bris, and one should not deviate from the established method without a valid reason.

It seems to me that an analgesic such as Tylenol, which reduces the intensity of the pain but does not eliminate it completely like an anesthetic would, should be acceptable even according to the most stringent opinion. It is interesting to point out that the Israeli Health Ministry only allows the use of a topical cream for pain relief during Bris Milah but not an injection.

posted:2009-10-19 14:23:54  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Listerine Breath Strips
Submitted by chaim  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: They would be no worse then mouthwash or toothpaste, although some opinions require a hechsher on mouthwash and toothpaste.
posted:2009-10-16 11:44:08  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - shabbos elevator
Submitted by Brian  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The subject is a long-running debate among the Poskim, and most of those who permitted Shabbos elevators in the past continue to allow their use. You should continue to consult the Rav who allowed you to use them in the past.
posted:2009-10-12 17:50:41  (0) comments   email to a friend


Displaying 316-330 of 948 (Page 22 / 64) 
FirstPrev ... 21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30 ...  Next Last

 

    Most Viewed Lists
  1. "Zissen" Pesach
  2. Toivel Hot water Urn
  3. Bracha for bANANAS
  4. sprinkler on Shabbos clock
  5. candle lighting
    Last Viewed
  1. Halacha LeMaaseh Text
  2. Shabbos
  3. Conversion
  4. Yom Ha'atzmut
  5. Minsha Bikurim - unique cases - do they bring/recite?