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Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - Shabes
Submitted by schneider tzvi  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: If it is the only bathroom and is difficult to use in the dark, it is permitted because of kavod habriyos.
posted:2009-04-22 15:40:39  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - mechiras chametz
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:  

He did the right thing, because if he would have sold the chametz through a Rav on the West Coast he would have had a much bigger problem. Since the chametz would have become assur before the sale took effect, the sale would not have been valid according to many opinions and he would have been considered to own the chametz the entire Pesach. While ideally he should have stipulated that he did not want to reacquire the chametz before Pesach ended in the Pacific time zone, the Rav could not transfer ownership to him when it was to his detriment, and he did not possess the chametz until Pesach ended where he was located at the time. Therefore, there is no problem for him to use the chametz now.

posted:2009-04-20 17:24:46  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Flour Grinded after Pesach
Submitted by Rivka Rochel  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

They are concerned that the mechiras chametz may not have been valid for various reasons. This is a chumra and depends upon your minhag, because today many precautions are taken to insure the legitimacy of the sale.

One certainly must sell whiskey for Pesach, as it is chometz and may not be used after Pesach if it was not sold.

posted:2009-04-20 09:51:18  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - heter iska
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Yehonoson Hool
Question:
Answer: It is forbidden to borrow with interest from any Jew. Interestingly, there was a suggestion that a father may lend money to his young children with interest in order that they should learn the bitter taste of paying interest, and understand how severe is the punishment for those who lend with interest, but the Gemora (Bava Metzia 75a) rejects this and forbids this too.

However, one may lend money using a Hetter Iska, in which case any extra money paid is not actually interest at all.

A Hetter Iska document can be attained from most "Beth Din"s. Have someone explain it to you before signing, as many Poskim hold that someone who has no idea how the Hetter Iska works cannot use such a document.
posted:2009-04-19 12:40:24  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kitniyot Ashkenaz Sephardi
Submitted by Jarrod Williams  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

It is very considerate of them to inconvenience themselves to accommodate you and I understand your wish to minimize the imposition. However, you may not eat kitniyos on Pesach even in the house on one who does, although you need not be concerned if they use the same utensils. Minhagim follow the person and not the house, the exception being if one permanently moves to a new community with different minhagim.

posted:2009-04-12 03:05:25  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Shma
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

The Steipler writes in Kreina D'Igrsa that all of the different havaros today have imperfect aspects and it is impossible to know exactly which way is correct to pronounce Lashon HaKodesh. Therefore he concludes that one should retain the minhag of his father and not change, and with this he is yotzei l'chatchila.

posted:2009-04-08 09:03:59  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kitniyos accident
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

According to Halacha kitniyos is much more lenient than chometz and is batel if it is the minority of the mixture, which is obviously the case here. While the minhag is to be machmir and use separate utensils for kitniyos even when it is permitted such as a baby's formula, under cases of significant loss one may rely on the basic Halacha that it is permitted.

This applies if the soy oil was certified Kosher for Pesach by a reliably Sefardi hechsher to insure that it contains nothing other than soy oil, however if it had no Pesach hashgacha it is not permitted to eat on Pesach. I have heard from a Sefardi Rav active in kashrus that even today it is very common to find kernels of wheat mixed in with soybeans, and soy oil is likely to be chometz and not just kitniyos.

posted:2009-04-06 18:15:49  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Pickled Meats
Submitted by chaim  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

I'm not familiar with the details of the pickling process, but the more ingredients and additives you include the kashrus issues expand exponentially. Spices, like all products, should only be used with a reliable hechsher.

posted:2009-04-06 11:26:16  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - cavana in tefilla
Submitted by Rephael  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

We do not repeat a tefilla due to lack of kavana, because there is no guarantee that you will have full concentration on every word the second time either. You do not need to worry that you may have forgotten a beracha, because when one says things that are familiar to him we assume he said it accurately.

posted:2009-04-03 00:57:09  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Sfira
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

If the Yeshiva has a defined minhag, that would be considered minhag hamakom and has precedence over your father's minhag.

posted:2009-04-02 18:36:16  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - s.c. oven solves milching/fleishing/parve problem?
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Theoretically one could change between all 3 with a self-clean cycle un between. However there are two issues to deal with. First of all according to many opinions the self-clean cycle can only serve as kashering if it reaches a temperature of at least 900-1000F. While American self-clean ovens do get thus hot, I have heard that the European ones do not. Additionally the Magen Avraham points out a very practical problem that if one changes the status of a utensil from milk to meat, he could easily become confused where it is holding and use it for the wrong use. Therefore he rules that one may not change from meat to milk and the opposite without other considerations, and this is the Ashkenazi minhag. I don't know if Sefardim accepted this chumra, but it certainly seems like a very legitimate concern.

posted:2009-04-02 14:03:09  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashering clothes for Pessach
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

While it is common to have many additional chumros for Pesach, as a good rule of thumb of you don't know anyone else who does something it is a good idea to ask. In Halacha it is sufficient to just brush the clothes well to assume that no crumbs remain, and then there is no need to be concerned that crumbs will fall into the food. Even though it is praiseworthy to take extra measures to avoid even a slight chance of even a crumb of chometz, certainly washing with detergent or dry cleaning would nullify any chometz that might remain and come in contact with the food. It would be unfortunate to miss out in the Mitzva and experience of having guests for the Seder to be machmir and worry about crumbs on the guests clothing.

posted:2009-04-02 13:42:59  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Dairy cutting board used for meat
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Since the cutting board had not been used with dairy for more than 24 hours prior to its use with meat, it does not make other objects treif. The only exception would be an onion that was cut with a fleishig knife on the dairy cutting board. Even the knife itself does not need to be kashered according to most opinions, although it is preferable to do so.

posted:2009-04-02 09:37:42  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - chometz
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

If it contains alcohol it may be chometz, but in its current state it is certainly not fitting for a dog to eat. Therefore, according to the letter of the law it may be used, but the minhag is not to use liquids containing alcohol without Pesach approval.

posted:2009-03-31 23:43:03  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - your psak on sugar crisp
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

First of all I neither wrote this psak nor did I see it before you brought it to my attention. However Reb Moshe does not write that it should not be eaten outside of a bread meal, rather he acknowledges that Sugar Crisps is the type of food that people typically do not eat with bread and seems to accept this situation as a given. He does seem to hold that mezonos is not the correct beracha, and one is only yotzai because mezonos is also an all-inclusive beracha similar to shehakol. In my humble opinion anyone who says mezonos on rice should also say mezonos on Sugar Crisps for reasons too involved to explain in this forum, but I certainly agree with you that ideally it should be covered by making berachos on other foods that are more certain.

posted:2009-03-22 13:48:33  (0) comments   email to a friend


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