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Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - jewish king
Submitted by shlomo-zalman  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: No. Appointing a king requires a Sanhedrin of 71 and a navi, both of which we no longer have.
posted:2008-08-08 00:52:23  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Shaving
Submitted by Elie  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

There is a long standing machlokes on this issue with many great Poskim permitting elactric shavers and many other great Poskim fobidding them. Each person should follow his Posek, and the Litvishe Poskim in America have consistantly permitted many electric shavers. I will point out that while the Chofetz Chaim in sefer Likutei Halachos on Maseches Makkos does forbid shaving with a "machineka", the sefer was printed 15 years before the invention of the mechanincal shaver and he was presumably refering to the safety razor that was just becoming popular in that time period.

I am not familiar with all the current models of shavers, but my understanding is that according to the Poskim who permit shaving, the microscreen are not a problem and the rotary are only a problem if they are lift-and-cut.

posted:2008-08-07 01:41:55  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Maaser
Submitted by jack  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Generally the maximum maaser allowed by Halacha is 20% of net income. The reason for this limit is that if one would over-give, he may make himself impoverished and need to ask for handouts himself. Therefore, the Poskim allow one who is very wealthy and has numerous assets to exceed the 20% limit, on the asumption that he will leave over enough for himself. Of course it is wonderful that you are asking such a question and it displays a generous heart. Most people ask about the minimum.
posted:2008-07-31 18:53:15  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - conversion
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

This is too sensitive and delicate of a topic to resolve online, but let me help you clarify some of the issues you will need to discuss in person with your Rabbi. First, you should strive to determine precisely who in your ancestry was Jewish. If it was your mother's mother's mother, then you are a born Jew and conversion is irrelevant. However if your mother's maternal ancestry was not Jewish then you were born a non-Jew and require a conversion. Conversion to Judaism by definition requires a commitment to observe the Jewish religion, and if that commitment was not present on your part at the time of conversion, then bris, mikva and Beis Din did not help you. If you were personally committed at the time, then there are many details that would need to be clarified about your conversion to determine its possible validity. however, even if your original conversion was not valid according to Halacha, there is still a solution. Assuming that at the present you are committed to Mitzvah observance, you could undergo a second, Orthodox conversion. This way you would not have to choose between your family and Torah observance. Again, there are many details involved, and you should discuss them with a knowledgeable Orthodox Rabbi who is familiar with your situation.

posted:2008-07-30 19:49:37  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - head covering
Submitted by Idella Goldenberg  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: A widow must continue to cover her hair after her husband's passing. Rav Moshe Feinstein zatzal under certain circumstances allowed a young widow to cease covering her hair to make it easier for her to remarry, however, for someone of your age this dispensation would not apply.
posted:2008-07-28 21:50:32  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - re marriage.
Submitted by sam  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Congratulations on your upcoming marriage. There is no need to do anything further as a civil marriage is not binding nor is a marriage to a non-Jew.
posted:2008-07-20 20:12:59  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Torah in the house
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

As long as the Sefer Torah is in a different room it is permitted.

However, I question the use of this segula. Shulchan Aruch and mefarshim in OC 135 list numerous conditions for moving a Sefer Torah, such as being needed for an important person to read from who cannot travel to shul, and it will be read from at least 3 times; and this doesn't seem to meet them. If your Rav approved of this, I withdraw my hesitation, but I have never heard of such a practice.

posted:2008-07-18 15:15:19  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - premarital relationship
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: First of all, according to most authorities it is included in the prohibition against prostitution, "lo s'hiye k'daisha". Additionally, the girl is presumably a nidda, which is a very serious aveira and chayav kareis.
posted:2008-07-16 23:24:26  (2) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - birth control
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

I can understand your concern about using birth control pills because I know of a number of people who have suffered long term effects from manipulating their hormones. However, birth control pills prevent ovulation, which is permitted under certain circumstances, the "morning after" pill, on the other hand, prevents implantation and effectively kills a fertilized embryo, in effect a form of chemical abortion. Such extreme measures would only be allowed under very extreme cases of imminent life-threatening danger. You should go back to the Rabbi who permitted the use of birth control in the first place and explain your concerns. Ask him if he would allow the use of an IUD or a diaphragm which have less effects on the body and are not as bad as the "morning after" pill, but are more problematic in Halacha than birth control pills.

posted:2008-07-13 07:42:44  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - statues
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

First of all I wish you much success in you journey to religious observance and I hope that you can bring the rest of your family along with you through warmth and love, while maintaining complete compliance to the framework of Halacha. I commend your alacrity to want to be like Avraham Avinu who smashed his parent's idols, but in this case that will not be necessary. While there is an issur d'oraisa in keeping in one's house an image of the sun, moon or other heavenly bodies and there would be an absolute obligation to destroy them under certain circumstances, however an image of a person or animal is different. Though creating a human image is assur mi'deoraisa, maintaining it is only assur mi'drabbanan and can be delayed to avoid confrontation with your parents.

posted:2008-07-10 15:03:55  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha
Submitted by shaindy  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

The standard hormones prescribed are not a problem, but I can't say with certainty that none of the procedures are. Also, be aware that some can cause as many as 6-8 fetuses which is potentially very dangerous. Therefore, I would recommend consulting at each stage with a Rav who is knowledgeable in the subject. Much Hatzlacha.

posted:2008-07-09 16:21:19  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Ba'al Tashicit
Submitted by sean gordon  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: No, it's not necessary.
posted:2008-07-08 11:20:27  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - difference between torahs
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

There is a difference between the spelling of the word "daka" in Devarim 23:2 whether it ends in an aleph or a heh. The poskim say that since both are based on longstanding traditions accepted on each side by generations of great Talmidei Chachomim, one may make a beracha on an aliya in a Sefer Torah written in the opposite spelling.

posted:2008-07-07 23:42:06  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - squashing an ant
Submitted by ROLAND SEENER  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

You may kill an ant if it disturbs you even though it causes no physical pain.

It is forbidden to eat an ant like all other insects, but it is not one of the 8 sheratzim that renders one tameh through touching it.

posted:2008-07-07 22:07:41  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - smoking
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Actually your question is based on an inaccurate assumption. Recent scientific studies have proven that even a single cigarette causes permanent changes in the chemical structure of the brain and can lead to addiction as well as reduced heart function etc. Therefore, it is absolutely forbidden to smoke even just one cigarette.

posted:2008-07-02 23:35:44  (2) comments   email to a friend


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